Six Feet Under Series Finale

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  • #1975

    Editor
    Moderator

    We are interested in the communities take on the landmark HBO series “Six Feet Under”. Any comments?

    #1974

    Anonymous

    I do not subscribe to HBO and do not know what the show is about. Sorry!

    #1977

    Anonymous

    Of course, none of this has to do with diamondhead, but who cares!!

    We have watched this show from it’s inception and think it is about as good as any TV drama has ever been. We are truly sad that it is finished!

    This past week my husband and I had a discussion about the ‘meaning’ of this truly thought-provoking series. He feels that it is very negative, a sort of ‘death-worshipping’ type of show, always showing the problems and sufering of its characters and not much success or happiness (even though he finds it compelling and watches it rabidly as I do). It is interesting that the series struck him that way because it was the opposite for me. I felt the ‘point’ of the whole series is that death is final, it will strike us all, and that we should truly appreciate the moments of happiness that we have. Life has its ups and downs and that is what makes the ups so precious. After I watched this show every week it always made me feel more appreciative for what I have. How can that be negative? One interesting thing about the show is that there was always an undercurrent in many of the stories holding up parenthood as one of the great joys of life and childhood as something sacred in terms of our ability to experience joy. All the characters somehow silently agreed to this and there was always the utmost care taken to protect the child characters from developing a negative feeling about life. It celebrated the love of family (as opposed to career, money, etc.)as the only source of true joy and the fact that our lives are so brief and muddled makes these relationships stand out in import. This series did something, somehow, to magnify the importance of love, in all its forms, in the lives of its characters. This sounds hokey but it was true for me when viewing this great series.

    Except for a few episodes, this series was perfectly and realistically written and acted in a way I have never seen before, especially the first season. The finale was, in my estimate, incredibly creative and the only perfect way the series could have ended (although Keith being shot dead gave credence to my husband’s point a little – I didn’t like that!).

    The fact that this program can be interpreted many different ways is what makes it so complex – and so good – as is all art.
    Just my two cents.
    -Kbachman

    #1978

    Anonymous

    Of course, none of this has to do with diamondhead, but who cares!!

    We have watched this show from it’s inception and think it is about as good as any TV drama has ever been. We are truly sad that it is finished!

    This past week my husband and I had a discussion about the ‘meaning’ of this truly thought-provoking series. He feels that it is very negative, a sort of ‘death-worshipping’ type of show, always showing the problems and sufering of its characters and not much success or happiness (even though he finds it compelling and watches it rabidly as I do). It is interesting that the series struck him that way because it was the opposite for me. I felt the ‘point’ of the whole series is that death is final, it will strike us all, and that we should truly appreciate the moments of happiness that we have. Life has its ups and downs and that is what makes the ups so precious. After I watched this show every week it always made me feel more appreciative for what I have. How can that be negative? One interesting thing about the show is that there was always an undercurrent in many of the stories holding up parenthood as one of the great joys of life and childhood as something sacred in terms of our ability to experience joy. All the characters somehow silently agreed to this and there was always the utmost care taken to protect the child characters from developing a negative feeling about life. It celebrated the love of family (as opposed to career, money, etc.)as the only source of true joy and the fact that our lives are so brief and muddled makes these relationships stand out in import. This series did something, somehow, to magnify the importance of love, in all its forms, in the lives of its characters. This sounds hokey but it was true for me when viewing this great series.

    Except for a few episodes, this series was perfectly and realistically written and acted in a way I have never seen before, especially the first season. The finale was, in my estimate, incredibly creative and the only perfect way the series could have ended (although Keith being shot dead gave credence to my husband’s point a little – I didn’t like that!).

    The fact that this program can be interpreted many different ways is what makes it so complex – and so good – as is all art.
    Just my two cents.
    -Kbachman

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